Kitchen Designs Ideas 2011 by Candice Olson

Function meets style when designer Candice Olson creates a gathering place for the whole family in the kitchen.




Open Yet Divided





To create visual separation between the kitchen and family room, Candice designs a light and airy look for the kitchen. The main cabinets are painted cream with a strie finish and topped with cream quartz countertops. A backsplash in handcrafted, multicolored glass tile is the perfect complement and adds a bit of excitement to the space.





Industrial Chic





Candice creates a large open-concept kitchen with a system of wooden posts and beams with steel joinery, which are not only crucial for support, but also give the room an open, loft-like feeling. Shaker-style cabinets, a grey-green glass tiled backsplash and polished quartz countertops that has the appearance of concrete keep with the industrial look.





Practical Style





Rich cabinetry, state-of-the art appliances and a host of contemporary fixtures and finishes create a kitchen that's a mix of style and function. A large, square island is the focal point of the kitchen and can be used for preparation and eating.





Streamlined Elegance





The focal point of this kitchen is the stunning backsplash comprised of chocolate, coffee and cream mosaic glass tiles. Espresso cabinets and white quartz countertops contrast well with the stainless steel appliances and hardware. A 14-foot-long kitchen island serves two functions, a lower section features a built-in sink and storage for a bar area and the higher section functions as the dining area.





Classic Meets Modern





The L-shaped kitchen is a blend of traditional and contemporary, particularly in the island, which is an antique wooden cabinet topped with classic Carrara marble. White shaker-style cabinets and sleek quartz countertops are combined with stainless steel appliances and fixtures, while green glass tiles are used for the backsplash and to add a bit of color above the cabinets.





Mid-Century Charm





To pay homage to the home's mid-century modern design, the kitchen layout maximizes the outdoor view and features streamlined zebra-wood cabinetry with white quartz countertops. Vintage-style pendants and funky barstools add a retro touch.





Blend of Function and Fashion





Cream cabinetry with mushroom countertops is combined with travertine floor tiles for a functional yet stylish kitchen, and bold wallpaper is a stunning focal point behind the workstation. Lit by two crystal chandeliers, a dark wood island with creamy quartz countertop houses a recycling center, a dishwasher and sink, as well as doubles as an eating space.





Serenely Blue





The backsplash is the perfect area to inject personality into your kitchen. Glass tiles that complement the grey-blue walls create a clean, contemporary backdrop between the contrasting black and white cabinets.





Warm and Welcoming





Custom cabinetry in a creamy shade and mushroom-colored quartz countertop set the tone for this functional kitchen, while the island takes center stage with espresso cabinetry and cream countertops. Eco-friendly cork flooring grounds the space and is perfect for a space where you're standing all the time. Brushed bronze finishes add a traditional touch to the kitchen.

A History of US Military Involvement Around The World

I am posting this link purely as a further outlet for this information resource, not as a reflection on US military intervention, hegemony or morality.

Given the time period that is covered, 1798-2010, disallows me as a Brit, from taking any moral stance on the issue. For a hundred and fifty of the two hundred years in question, I don't think Britain would have passed any kind of morality test regarding its foreign policy.


Instances of Use of United States Armed Forces Abroad, 1798-2010
Richard F. Grimmett
Specialist in International Security
March 10, 2011
Link PDF


The structure in the background is Blackpool's North Pier, something I habitually fished off as a kid. It was then quite a bit longer, being possessed of a jetty, built originally to facilitate the many pleasure steamers that used to ply their trade from the then ever increasingly popular resort.



Below, colour or sepia.



Unfortunately, in the 1960s, this masterpiece of Victorian ironwork, was subjected to a cultural and architectural assault that can never be forgiven. Turning an enchanting piece of our heritage into the worst example of twentieth century modern. (shite)






The only photograph I could find, that records the villainous act of vandalism perpetrated on the old girl. Perhaps not a bad thing.

Completed in 1863 at a cost of about £12,000, (hard to believe) the pier is now a grade two listed structure. Brief history.

Tips for staying healthy in hot temperatures

With the arrival of summer and hot weather upon us, Dr. Ron Chapman, director of the California Department of Public Health, is encouraging California residents to follow these top-10 helpful tips to stay safe this summer:

• Reduce exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. when UV rays are strongest, and keep physical activities to a minimum during that time. When working outside, drink plenty of water or juice even if you are not thirsty, and take rest breaks in the shade.

• Wear a wide-brimmed hat to cover the face and neck, and wear loose-fitting clothing to keep cool and to protect your skin from the sun and mosquitoes.

• Wear sunglasses that provide 100 percent UVA and UVB protection. Chronic exposure to the sun can cause cataracts, which left untreated, can lead to blindness.

• Liberally apply sunscreen (at least SPF 15)

15 minutes before venturing outdoors and re-apply at least every two hours — sunscreen prevents skin cancer, the number one cancer affecting Californians and prevents premature aging.

• Never, EVER leave infants, children or frail elderly unattended in a parked car. It can take as little as 10 minutes for the temperature inside a car to rise to levels that can kill.

• To prevent overheating, use cool compresses, misting, showers and baths — if you or someone experiences a rapid, strong pulse, feels delirious, becomes unconscious or has a body temperature above 102, call 911 immediately.

• Prevent children from drowning by providing adult supervision at all times and having a safety barrier that surrounds a pool or spa. Drowning is the leading cause of injury deaths for children under five.

• Make sure that your doors and windows have tight-fitting screens to keep out mosquitoes. Some mosquitoes carry West Nile Virus, which can mimic influenza symptoms such as fever, body aches and eye pain.

The virus can cause serious health complications and in rare cases, death.

• Apply insect repellent containing DEET, picaradin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR 3535 according to label instructions.

Mosquitoes usually bite in the early morning and evening so it is important to wear repellent during those times.

• Eliminate all sources of standing water on your property, including flower pots, old car tires, rain gutters and pet bowls — mosquitoes breed and lay eggs in standing water.

For more tips on staying cool in the summer sun, go online to www.cdph.ca.gov.

Candice Olson's Kitchen Design Ideas 2011

Create your own divine kitchen with Candice Olson's top 10 kitchen design and decorating tips




Open Up Your Space





Knock out a wall to add space to your kitchen. This kitchen seamlessly integrates with the dining area, using a buffet island to separate the two.





The Necessary Island





If your kitchen is all about family, invest in an island. This long island features a stunning white quartz countertop, white and chrome bar chairs, and a dark wood base to match the mahogany floor.





Durable Solutions





Design your dream kitchen for durability. Three kinds of porcelain tile and carefully planned cabinet storage make this kitchen a stylish workhorse.





Update Cabinets





On a budget? Refinish existing cabinetry. These former maple cabinets look custom with their new finish and same-color painted bulkhead.





Love Your Kitchen





Design your kitchen to cater to what you love. This baker's dream kitchen includes a peninsula for entertaining, a lounge area and comfortable flooring.





Use a Similar Color





Integrate family rooms into the kitchen through color. Dark, espresso-toned cabinets coordinate well with this space's black sofa and warm khaki walls.





Find Inspiration in Your Favorites





Bring the charm of your favorite place to the kitchen. Displaced after Hurricane Katrina, this couple now live in a Big Easy kitchen with French-style accessories.





Unique Flooring





Make a statement with your kitchen flooring. Stripes of light and dark concrete-like material add an unexpected touch to this contemporary kitchen.





Creative Backsplashes




Backsplashes add character to the kitchen. This tin-tile backsplash was painted cream for an antique effect.




Mix It Up



Two-toned kitchens are more interesting than one-toned. A marble island, different cabinet finishes and Art Deco tile make this Candice's favorite Divine Design kitchen makeover

Mississippi: Lose Your Baby Face a Murder Charge

I had hoped to say a few words about this, but in truth, I just don't know what to say.


Outcry in America as pregnant women who lose babies face murder charges

Women's rights campaigners see the creeping criminalisation of pregnant women as a new front in the culture wars over abortion

Rennie Gibbs is accused of murder, but the crime she is alleged to have committed does not sound like an ordinary killing. Yet she faces life in prison in Mississippi over the death of her unborn child.

Gibbs became pregnant aged 15, but lost the baby in December 2006 in a stillbirth when she was 36 weeks into the pregnancy. When prosecutors discovered that she had a cocaine habit – though there is no evidence that drug abuse had anything to do with the baby's death – they charged her with the "depraved-heart murder" of her child, which carries a mandatory life sentence.

Gibbs is the first woman in Mississippi to be charged with murder relating to the loss of her unborn baby. But her case is by no means isolated. Across the US more and more prosecutions are being brought that seek to turn pregnant women into criminals.

"Women are being stripped of their constitutional personhood and subjected to truly cruel laws," said Lynn Paltrow of the campaign National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW). "It's turning pregnant women into a different class of person and removing them of their rights."

Bei Bei Shuai, 34, has spent the past three months in a prison cell in Indianapolis charged with murdering her baby. On 23 December she tried to commit suicide by taking rat poison after her boyfriend abandoned her.

Shuai was rushed to hospital and survived, but she was 33 weeks pregnant and her baby, to whom she gave birth a week after the suicide attempt and whom she called Angel, died after four days. In March Shuai was charged with murder and attempted foeticide and she has been in custody since without the offer of bail.

In Alabama at least 40 cases have been brought under the state's "chemical endangerment" law. Introduced in 2006, the statute was designed to protect children whose parents were cooking methamphetamine in the home and thus putting their children at risk from inhaling the fumes.

Amanda Kimbrough is one of the women who have been ensnared as a result of the law being applied in a wholly different way. During her pregnancy her foetus was diagnosed with possible Down's syndrome and doctors suggested she consider a termination, which Kimbrough declined as she is not in favour of abortion.

The baby was delivered by caesarean section prematurely in April 2008 and died 19 minutes after birth.

Six months later Kimbrough was arrested at home and charged with "chemical endangerment" of her unborn child on the grounds that she had taken drugs during the pregnancy – a claim she has denied.

"That shocked me, it really did," Kimbrough said. "I had lost a child, that was enough."

She now awaits an appeal ruling from the higher courts in Alabama, which if she loses will see her begin a 10-year sentence behind bars. "I'm just living one day at a time, looking after my three other kids," she said. "They say I'm a criminal, how do I answer that? I'm a good mother."

Women's rights campaigners see the creeping criminalisation of pregnant women as a new front in the culture wars over abortion, in which conservative prosecutors are chipping away at hard-won freedoms by stretching protection laws to include foetuses, in some cases from the day of conception. In Gibbs' case defence lawyers have argued before Mississippi's highest court that her prosecution makes no sense. Under Mississippi law it is a crime for any person except the mother to try to cause an abortion.

"If it's not a crime for a mother to intentionally end her pregnancy, how can it be a crime for her to do it unintentionally, whether by taking drugs or smoking or whatever it is," Robert McDuff, a civil rights lawyer asked the state supreme court.

McDuff told the Guardian that he hoped the Gibbs prosecution was an isolated example. "I hope it's not a trend that's going to catch on. To charge a woman with murder because of something she did during pregnancy is really unprecedented and quite extreme."

He pointed out that anti-abortion groups were trying to amend the Mississippi constitution by setting up a state referendum, or ballot initiative, that would widen the definition of a person under the state's bill of rights to include a foetus from the day of conception.

Some 70 organisations across America have come together to file testimonies, known as amicus briefs, in support of Gibbs that protest against her treatment on several levels. One says that to treat "as a murderer a girl who has experienced a stillbirth serves only to increase her suffering".

Another, from a group of psychologists, laments the misunderstanding of addiction that lies behind the indictment. Gibbs did not take cocaine because she had a "depraved heart" or to "harm the foetus but to satisfy an acute psychological and physical need for that particular substance", says the brief.

Perhaps the most persuasive argument put forward in the amicus briefs is that if such prosecutions were designed to protect the unborn child, then they would be utterly counter-productive: "Prosecuting women and girls for continuing [a pregnancy] to term despite a drug addiction encourages them to terminate wanted pregnancies to avoid criminal penalties. The state could not have intended this result when it adopted the homicide statute."

Paltrow sees what is happening to Gibbs as a small taste of what would be unleashed were the constitutional right to an abortion ever overturned. "In Mississippi the use of the murder statute is creating a whole new legal standard that makes women accountable for the outcome of their pregnancies and threatens them with life imprisonment for murder."

From protection to punishment

At least 38 of the 50 states across America have introduced foetal homicide laws that were intended to protect pregnant women and their unborn children from violent attacks by third parties – usually abusive male partners – but are increasingly being turned by renegade prosecutors against the women themselves.

South Carolina was one of the first states to introduce such a foetal homicide law. National Advocates for Pregnant Women has found only one case of a South Carolina man who assaulted a pregnant woman having been charged under its terms, and his conviction was eventually overturned. Yet the group estimates there have been up to 300 women arrested for their actions during pregnancy.

In other states laws designed to protect children against the damaging effects of drugs have similarly been twisted to punish childbearers. Guardian


Modern Dining Rooms Ideas 2011 Designers By " HGTV "




Symmetrical design and elegant lines convey formality in this modern dining room. Photo by Mayer Bowden Photography.





Stone and columns dress up this simple square dining room. The contemporary furniture and lighting are in hues of orange and red, making the space seem decadent and inviting. Bon appetit!





This room is set apart by its bold artwork and colorfully vibrant floral. These bright colors are able to pop with the backdrop of cool white chairs and ebony furnishings and flooring. The lighting is also light and fresh with oversized shades and a mod, urban look.Design Tip: The Wow factor in this room is not just from the artwork and flowers, but also the important contrast in dark-white colors on the chairs, walls and baseboards.







The spiral chandelier echoes the round shape of the dining table in this dining room. Decorative elements like the glass sculptures and the round plant pots also contain round shapes. Repetition is a way to create a unified space.




The dark wooden dining room set instantly attracts the eye, and the metallic light fixture adds a modern touch while the beautiful pebbles inserted below the table’s glass top bring the outdoors in.




The dining room reveals the continuation of the quality details like the chandelier featured in this shot. Balancing the size of the dining set and the pattern of the wallpaper in the dining area achieves a look of unexpected grandness.





Our goal for this project was to transform a cold yet architecturally significant space into a warm, inviting home featuring artistic, high-end furniture, rugs and lighting. All pieces were to be authentic, unique and interesting, yet very comfortable.





This large round dining table is ideal for a dinner party or gathering. The Tortuga Dining Table was custom designed by SPI with a CaesarStone top and an ebonized wood base.





An elegant dining room with modern, sparkling accents is glamorous with its waterfall-inspired beaded chandelier

Modern Windows Treatment Ideas 2011



New Neutrals


Designer Lori Gilder says "charcoal and slate are the new neutrals and blend beautifully with the metallic trends." This darker neutral frames a window elegantly and adds a more sophisticated look to your room. Design by Genevieve Gorder.



Jewel Tones



Window treatments in jewel tones, which range from deep reds to subtle blues, are sophisticated and create the atmosphere of luxury in any space. Designer Jennifer Duneier says, "Jewel tones, like amethyst and turquoise, are popular mixed with soft metallics such as platinum or brushed nickel." Image Courtesy of Casa Fiora.



Stainless Steel




Not just a favorite for appliances anymore, stainless steel is making its way throughout the home. To incorporate this trend into your window treatments, designer Lori Gilder suggests threading stainless steel and other metallic curtain rods through simple eyelets at the top of panels to create a simple unadorned look. Design by Erinn Valencich.



Cheery Yellow


Brighten up a room with cheerful draperies. According to designer Lori Gilder, "Yellow epitomizes warmth and a sunny outlook toward the future.



Layer Shades


"Another trend is to layer shades," says Jennifer Duneier. "A blackout shade might be installed right next to the window with a sheer shade in front of it.



Metallics


"Metallic surfaces are back in vogue," says Lori Gilder. "Silver, bronze and gold metallic fabrics layered with sheers are making a grand appearance in living rooms and bedrooms. The simple layering of these metallics draped from a classic metal rod blends beautifully with the latest color trends.



Trim It Up


Personalize window treatments with decorative embellishments. Designer Jennifer Duneier uses trim to create custom-designed treatments. Tapes with shells or buttons attached to them are becoming more popular as well.



Natural Elements


Organic materials are bringing nature indoors. "It’s all about nature-inspired and eco-friendly materials and designs," says designer Lori Gilder. "It’s no longer a trend, but more of a philosophy in the evolution of design. Bamboo, matchstick blinds and natural woven shades layered with simple sheer linen panels create an elegant yet earthy sophistication in any space.



Let the Light In


One trend that's always in style is using window treatments that allow a lot of natural light into the space. Designer Jennifer Duneier suggests to "use simple panels of sheer fabrics to add warmth to the room but still let light through. Many fabric houses are making fabulous sheers in all colors, not just white or cream. They're also using great linen blends with more contemporary patterns. Design by Andreea Avram Rusu.

Michele Batshit Bachmann

Before moving on to the main article, here are a couple of other Bachmann links for your perusal. This I remind you, from a woman that wishes to be the next President of the United States of America.

Bachmann: Schools should teach intelligent design

But President of which America? one where poor people become poorer, (but she would still like your vote) and rich people become richer, seems to be Bachmann's ideal for the future one Nation Under God. Doesn't strike me as a terribly Christian ethos to say the least.

Bachmann Says She Would Eliminate Minimum Wage to Spur Growth

Abortion, birth control, women's rights, church and state? I don't even need to offer links, because you know exactly what her position is going to be on all these issues.

But if you wish you can read/watch as Democracy Now looks a little deeper into Bachmann's past; lies included. Far too professional a broadcaster to do it herself, Amy Goodman leaves it to her two guests to pick apart Michele Bachmann.

''A perfect Product of the Religious Right'' Deconstructing Michele Bachmann's GOP Presidential Bid.

And so to our featured article courtesy of Rolling Stone.

I suppose there are many things that make for a good article. Primarily it must hold your interest. Being informative certainly does no harm, even less harm to the message on offer, is that the thing is well written. Dependant on one's viewpoint I suppose, as to what constitutes well written that is, personally speaking I have always been an advocate for a good term of phrase.

Being a great fan, and reasonably read of the works of the master himself, the darling Oscar, might in someway explain my appreciation of the aforementioned well rounded phrase. Whereas sadly, we are unlikely ever again to be treated to words comparable or as sophisticated as those uttered by the inimitable old dear, that doesn't mean we can't still appreciate the contributions of twenty first century others.

Nor for that matter, do we even need such Oscaresque sophistication; Oscar was indeed a man of the world, but we could never label him a man of the common people. That I suppose, is the difference between now and then, Wilde was a man of his time, playing to a contemporary gallery, just as our writer in question is equally a man of his time, and his own style contemporaneous with his own gallery, to wit, the readers of Rolling Stone.

So what can we look forward to in this offering, interesting and informative apart? Scattered throughout, like seeds at a tennis match, such delights as this:

Bachmann is a religious zealot whose brain is a raging electrical storm of divine visions and paranoid delusions.

Not to shabby for an opener, you'll try a little more?

...when she turns her head toward the cameras and brandishes her pearls and her ageless, unblemished neckline and her perfect suburban orthodontics in an attempt to reassure the unbeliever of her non-threateningness, is one of the scariest sights in the entire American cultural tableau

And still barely past halfway on the title page:

...is a rare breed of political psychopath, equal parts crazed Divine Wind kamikaze-for-Jesus and calculating, six-faced Machiavellian prevaricator

Do drive on, do enjoy.

Michele Bachmann's Holy War
The Tea Party contender may seem like a goofball, but be warned: Her presidential campaign is no laughing matter
By Matt Taibbi
June 22, 2011


Close your eyes, take a deep breath, and, as you consider the career and future presidential prospects of an incredible American phenomenon named Michele Bachmann, do one more thing. Don't laugh.

It may be the hardest thing you ever do, for Michele Bachmann is almost certainly the funniest thing that has ever happened to American presidential politics. Fans of obscure 1970s television may remember a short-lived children's show called Far Out Space Nuts, in which a pair of dimwitted NASA repairmen, one of whom is played by Bob (Gilligan) Denver, accidentally send themselves into space by pressing "launch" instead of "lunch" inside a capsule they were fixing at Cape Canaveral. This plot device roughly approximates the political and cultural mechanism that is sending Michele Bachmann hurtling in the direction of the Oval Office.

Bachmann is a religious zealot whose brain is a raging electrical storm of divine visions and paranoid delusions. She believes that the Chinese are plotting to replace the dollar bill, that light bulbs are killing our dogs and cats, and that God personally chose her to become both an IRS attorney who would spend years hounding taxpayers and a raging anti-tax Tea Party crusader against big government. She kicked off her unofficial presidential campaign in New Hampshire, by mistakenly declaring it the birthplace of the American Revolution. "It's your state that fired the shot that was heard around the world!" she gushed. "You are the state of Lexington and Concord, you started the battle for liberty right here in your backyard."

Videos: Michele Bachmann's Craziest Moments

I said lunch, not launch! But don't laugh. Don't do it. And don't look her in the eyes; don't let her smile at you. Michele Bachmann, when she turns her head toward the cameras and brandishes her pearls and her ageless, unblemished neckline and her perfect suburban orthodontics in an attempt to reassure the unbeliever of her non-threateningness, is one of the scariest sights in the entire American cultural tableau. She's trying to look like June Cleaver, but she actually looks like the T2 skeleton posing for a passport photo. You will want to laugh, but don't, because the secret of Bachmann's success is that every time you laugh at her, she gets stronger.

In modern American politics, being the right kind of ignorant and entertainingly crazy is like having a big right hand in boxing; you've always got a puncher's chance. And Bachmann is exactly the right kind of completely batshit crazy. Not medically crazy, not talking-to-herself-on-the-subway crazy, but grandiose crazy, late-stage Kim Jong-Il crazy — crazy in the sense that she's living completely inside her own mind, frenetically pacing the hallways of a vast sand castle she's built in there, unable to meaningfully communicate with the human beings on the other side of the moat, who are all presumed to be enemies.

Bachmann's story, to hear her tell it, is about a suburban homemaker who is chosen by God to become a politician who will restore faith and family values to public life and do battle with secular humanism. But by the time you've finished reviewing her record of lies and embellishments and contradictions, you'll have no idea if she actually believes in her own divine inspiration, or whether it's a big con job. Or maybe both are true — in which case this hard-charging challenger for the GOP nomination is a rare breed of political psychopath, equal parts crazed Divine Wind kamikaze-for-Jesus and calculating, six-faced Machiavellian prevaricator. Whatever she is, she's no joke.

Matt Taibbi's 'The Truth About the Tea Party'

Bachmann was born Michele Amble in Waterloo, Iowa, to a pair of lifelong Democrats, but grew up in tiny Anoka, Minnesota. By her teen years, her parents had divorced; her mother remarried and brought step-siblings into the home, creating a Brady Bunchian group of nine kids. One of Bachmann's step-siblings, Helen LaFave, would later come out as a lesbian, a fact that Michele, who became famous opposing gay marriage, never mentions on the campaign trail. For the most part, though, Bachmann's upbringing seems like pure Americana, a typical Midwestern girl who was "in a couple of beauty pageants" and "not overtly political," according to her stepbrother Michael LaFave.

Young Michele found Jesus at age 16, not long before she went away to Winona State University and met a doltish, like-minded believer named Marcus Bachmann. After finishing college, the two committed young Christians moved to Oklahoma, where Michele entered one of the most ridiculous learning institutions in the Western Hemisphere, a sort of highway rest area with legal accreditation called the O.W. Coburn School of Law; Michele was a member of its inaugural class in 1979.

Originally a division of Oral Roberts University, this august academy, dedicated to the teaching of "the law from a biblical worldview," has gone through no fewer than three names — including the Christian Broadcasting Network School of Law. Those familiar with the darker chapters in George W. Bush's presidency might recognize the school's current name, the Regent University School of Law. Yes, this was the tiny educational outhouse that, despite being the 136th-ranked law school in the country, where 60 percent of graduates flunked the bar, produced a flood of entrants into the Bush Justice Department.

Regent was unabashed in its desire that its graduates enter government and become "change agents" who would help bring the law more in line with "eternal principles of justice," i.e., biblical morality. To that end, Bachmann was mentored by a crackpot Christian extremist professor named John Eidsmoe, a frequent contributor to John Birch Society publications who once opined that he could imagine Jesus carrying an M16 and who spent considerable space in one of his books musing about the feasibility of criminalizing blasphemy.

Take the Bachmann-Palin Challenge: Can You Tell Them Apart?

This background is significant considering Bachmann's leadership role in the Tea Party, a movement ostensibly founded on ideas of limited government. Bachmann says she believes in a limited state, but she was educated in an extremist Christian tradition that rejects the entire notion of a separate, secular legal authority and views earthly law as an instrument for interpreting biblical values. As a legislator, she not only worked to impose a ban on gay marriage, she also endorsed a report that proposed banning anyone who "espoused or supported Shariah law" from immigrating to the U.S. (Bachmann seems so unduly obsessed with Shariah law that, after listening to her frequent pronouncements on the subject, one begins to wonder if her crazed antipathy isn't born of professional jealousy.)

This discrepancy may account for why some Tea Party leaders don't buy Bachmann as a champion of small government. "Michele Bachmann is — what's the old-school term? — a poser," says Chris Littleton, an Ohio Tea Party leader troubled by her support of the Patriot Act and other big-government interventions. "Look at her record and see how 'Tea Party' she really is." Go to page two.


For readers who are unfamiliar with the workings of the Christian Right colleges, below is a Channel 4 documentary, God's Next Army, featuring not Michel Bachman's seat of learning, one of the most ridiculous learning institutions in the Western Hemisphere, a sort of highway rest area with legal accreditation called the O.W. Coburn School of Law previously part of Oral Roberts University, but that of another ''University'' that has the same curriculum employing the same single text book, Patrick Henry College.


This little quote by the principal Michael Farris seems to sum the whole thing up.

"We don't need the world's knowledge and information to guide us."

Something that always stuck with me after having watched the thing previously, was the reaction of one of these home schoolers (18 years old) on his first trip to Washington, was how awestruck he was when taking his first trip on the subway and that he was travelling by electricity!. One minute in on part four.


Prior to that, you might wish to watch four minutes of Bill Maher talking about such colleges. Not half as frivolous as you might imagine.







Part one of six.

Italian bedroom decoration style 2011

The Italian bedroom design is usually very warm, romantic and sophisticated. To create this special atmosphere, choose an antique head board made of oak or mahogany for your bed. You can also hang around your windows rich tapestry drapes and expose silver candle sticks or a copper pot full of perfumed rosemary on the bedside tables.